Proposed DUP deal would not undermine Good Friday Agreement, insists May

Proposed DUP deal would not undermine Good Friday Agreement, insists May

Yesterday Adams held a meeting in 10 Downing Street with British Prime Minister Theresa May where he informed her she was in breach of the Good Friday Agreement over her attempts to form a Government with the DUP. What they love to do is march around Northern Ireland, many wearing bowler hats and an orange sash.

The UK Government has warned that direct rule from London could be reimposed if the local parties fail to reach an agreement before the June 29 deadline.

But he said those arguments also needed to be made by a serving first and deputy first minister at Stormont.

British Prime Minister Theresa May’s government said yesterday it would launch her policy programme next week, a sign of confidence she will strike a deal to stay in power after days of political uncertainty since losing her majority.

“Everyone fears these talks of a hard border”, he said, “but I agree it must be a soft border that will ensure the goods from both countries can move easily between them”.

Reaffirming the Communist Party of Ireland’s “total opposition” to European Union membership, Mr McCartan argued that the issue was very problematic for Sinn Fein, which changed its position to support European Union membership in Britain’s referendum past year. “It continues and when the deal is done, it will be done”, a senior source in the Conservative Party said yesterday.

The institutions collapsed amid a bitter row between the DUP and Sinn Fein about a botched green energy scheme.

“There have been positive engagements today between ourselves and Sinn Fein”, he said. “If we had a strong signal that she were backsliding I think she would be in major difficulty”, the newspaper quoted one unidentified former minister as saying.

Sinn Fein has consistently made this point and Michelle O’Neill reiterated that with Prime Minister May.

“We want to see a Brexit that works for everybody, not just in Northern Ireland from my perspective but in the Republic of Ireland as well, so it is about a sensible Brexit”, Foster told reporters in Dublin.

These reasons include a corruption scandal involving Ms Foster and “the DUP’s ongoing refusal to implement key aspects of the Good Friday and subsequent binding agreements, such as introducing fair and impartial mechanisms to deal with the legacy of the conflict, a Bill of Rights and an Irish Language Act”, a measure to enhance the use of Irish Gaelic in public life.